Ghostwritten Statements

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Eric Love is a visual artist and musician who felt something is missing in his artistic experience. Painting in his studio, feeling lonely, and hoping that people would turn into his art events didn’t satisfy him. He asked himself why should people come out to view his fine art? He wished to create an artistic experience that attendees would get involved in, and not be as isolated as he felt. He later found LARP (live action role playing); an immediate and immersive art form. Eric thinks it’s a medium that could never be touched by its competitors. It fully engages us with our five senses, and there is no audience. Everyone is a participant and everyone needs to present. He produced the Legends of the Stars, a live series that incorporates LARP. He believes that the human experience has more freedom in the sandbox of science fiction. Through his series, he gives individuals the opportunity to redefine reality and recreate the laws of physics. Eric hides ideas through the fantasy world he offers as members discover a playful mystery. He seeks to foster the youthful element of LARP and imaginative events. Eric works with science fiction and fantasy themes because he thinks they are fun to play through. Eric acknowledges that roleplay is a higher brain function. Recognizing the value of immersive storytelling, he enshrines imagination. According to Eric, there is truth in fiction even though it told us that it was a lie at first. He is confident that each one of us can find our own truth in fiction, and is able to obtain a new perspective about our existence. Going through artistic extremes, he made a game of heavy division that the players enter; having characters emerge from chaos. He created a story about division, the self and the other, for everyone to go into. He wants people to get lost in the fantastical adventure they participate onsite. Eric challenges historical museum cultures and provides an innovative solution. The videogame generation isn’t interested in going to a museum if they can’t have any participatory experiences. For example, the reenactments of actual war events on historic ships that the Naval Ships Association offers to visitors aren’t as entertaining. It costs a fortune to keep historic battleships open for the public. It draws less visitors every year. Millennials are generally not interested in war history as it is harsh and static. In order to preserve history, he believes that the new generation needs to get involved through new possibilities, methodologies, and workshops brining in the fantasy element. Through the safe environment of Legends of the Stars, a storyline is supplied to the participants. In a mirage that is being created, it’s the people’s connections, interactions or stories that becomes the body of the work. A culture and community is born in the four day events. The participants are the stars of their story. His role is to help and support members in creating their own roles. Eric is convinced that experiencing stories firsthand is a life changing experience, rather than mere entertainment. One of his goals is to have the people be self-fulfilled through the journey they embark in an intriguing space. By taking these different personas, it changes the view of who the other is and how they can mirror themselves in this game. To play the game, you have to sustain disbelief. The rules of the game of reality changes. It’s an invitation to see the other in a new light. It brings people together. He desires the players to have a powerful human experience. The cause behind the theme is to harmonize humanity.

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