Etymology of an Artist

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  • Art: |ärt|Middle English: via Old French from Latin ars, art- . Archaic or dialect 2nd person singular present of be.
  • Community: late Middle English: from Old French comunete, reinforced by its source, Latin communitas, from communis (see common) .
  • Imagine: Middle English: from Old French imaginer, from Latin imaginare ‘form an image of, represent’ and imaginari ‘picture to oneself,’ both from imago, imagin- ‘image.’
  • Sing: Old English singan (verb), of Germanic origin; related to Dutch zingen and German singen .
  • Inspire: Middle English enspire, from Old French inspirer, from Latin inspirare ‘breathe or blow into,’ from in- ‘into’ + spirare ‘breathe.’ The word was originally used of a divine or supernatural being, in the sense ‘impart a truth or idea to someone.’
  • Create: late Middle English (in the sense ‘form out of nothing,’ used of a divine or supernatural being): from Latin creat- ‘produced,’ from the verb creare .
  • Music: Middle English: from Old French musique, via Latin from Greek mousikē (tekhnē)‘(art) of the Muses,’ from mousa ‘muse.’
  • Sphere: Middle English: from Old French espere, from late Latin sphera, earlier sphaera, from Greek sphaira ‘ball.’
  • Vocal: late Middle English: from Latin vocalis, from vox, voc- (see voice). Current senses of the noun date from the 1920s.
  • Lyric: late 16th cent.: from French lyrique or Latin lyricus, from Greek lurikos, from lura ‘lyre.’
  • Drama: early 16th cent.: via late Latin from Greek drama, from dran ‘do, act.’
  • Theatre: late Middle English (originally as ‘theatre’), from Old French, or from Latin theatrum, from Greek theatron, from theasthai ‘behold.’
  • Instrument: Middle English: from Old French, or from Latin instrumentum ‘equipment, implement,’ from the verb instruere ‘construct, equip.’
  • Note: Middle English ( sense 4 of the noun and sense 1 of the verb): from Old French note (noun), noter (verb), from Latin nota ‘a mark,’ notare ‘to mark.’
  • Guitar: early 17th cent.: from Spanish guitarra (partly via French), from Greek kithara, denoting an instrument similar to the lyre.
  • Drum: early 18th cent.: from Scottish Gaelic and Irish druim ‘ridge.’
  • Piano: mid 18th cent.: from Italian, earlier piano e forte ‘soft and loud,’ expressing the gradation in tone.
  • Band: late Middle English: from Old French bande, of Germanic origin; related to banner.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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